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Free Beagle Puppy Breeder Registration

 
New York Beagle Puppies .com, is an organization of beagle puppy lovers that was formed with the sole intention of placing the perfect beagle puppy with families throughout the country. All of our beagle puppies that are advertised are from responsible and professional beagle breeders. Our beagle puppies are of the finest quality and their health is guaranteed. Each beagle puppy that is advertised on our website is from responsible beagle breeders who we’ve personally screened. We do this to assure families they will receive a happy and healthy beagle puppy. We do everything possible to ensure that we only represent professional and responsible beagle breeders in New York. Our organization does not tolerate beagle breeders who do not abide by our strict guidelines. We are strongly against Puppy Mills or beagle puppy breeders who keep substandard conditions.

 
If you are a beagle breeder and would like to become a member of New York Beagle Puppies .com breeder network, please fill out the form below or call us. By filling out the form below, a member of our staff will contact you immediately to discuss your beagle puppy breeding standards.

 
 


Beagle Puppy Vaccinations

 
Vaccinating your puppy is the basis of good puppy care. Vaccines help reduce the risk of your Beagle Puppy acquiring diseases like parvovirus, distemper, kennel cough, and rabies. Vaccines are usually given when puppies reach 6-8 weeks of age and are given every 3-4 weeks until the puppy reaches 16-20 weeks of age. Boosters are then needed every one to three years. There are many different vaccine schedules your veterinarian might use. For example you puppy might receive shots at the following ages: 6, 9, 12, and a rabies vaccination at 15-16 weeks of age.

 
Puppies are usually vaccinated against: Distemper, Adenovirus (hepatitis), Parvovirus, and Parainfluenza. All of these vaccines are usually combined in one vaccine typically referred to as “the distemper shot.” Also depending on where you live, you may also need vaccines against Coronavirus, Lyme disease, Leptospirosis, and Bordetella. Rabies vaccination is needed as well and is required by law. Rabies vaccine is usually given at sixteen weeks of age, and then boostered a year later, and then boostered one to three years later depending on the local laws and regulations. Rabies vaccine is the only vaccine that you must absolutely get for your Beagle Puppy. Only a licensed veterinarian can administer a rabies vaccine. However, we recommend vaccinating with distemper shots as well as rabies.

CONSULT YOUR LOCAL VETERINARIAN FOR VACCINATION SCHEDULE

Beagle Puppy Toxic Foods


 

Chocolate/Caffeine: Chocolate contains theobromine which is a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. Symptoms from chocolate can include staggering, labored breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, abdominal pain, seizures, fever, heart rate increased, arrhythmia, coma, death.

 
Onions/Garlic: Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Out of the two, onions are more dangerous. Onion toxicity can cause haemolytic anaemia, where your puppy’s red blood cells burst while circulating in their body. Symptoms include Hemolytic Anemia, labored breathing, liver damage, vomiting, diarrhea, discolored urine. Usually symptoms appear a few days after ingesting onions. Garlic also includes this the toxic ingredient thiosulphate but is less toxic and large amounts would have to be eaten to cause illness.

 
Grapes/Raisins: As few as a handful of raisins or grapes can make your Beagle Puppy ill. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and lethargy.

 
Mushrooms: Certain mushrooms can be fatal. Amanita phalloides is the most commonly reported severely toxic species of mushroom in the US. Symptoms include drooling, abdominal pain, liver damage, kidney damage, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, coma, death.

 
Nuts/Macadamia Nuts: Macadamia nuts along with most other kinds of nuts can cause illness. Their high phosphorus content is said to possibly lead to bladder stones. Symptoms include development of tremors of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

Beagle Puppy Nail Trimming

 
Puppy nails have tiny sharp points that can easily scratch you, your children, or your furniture. It is important to keep your puppy’s nails trim. Untrimmed nails can also lead to broken nails that are painful and bleed. To trim your Beagle Puppy’s nails, you can simple use an ordinary nail clipper. You may want to hold your puppy in your lap or have someone hold your Beagle Puppy on a table. Hold your puppy’s paw firmly and push on his pads to extend the nail. Start cutting off only the very tip of the nail and make several small nips with the clippers instead of one larger one. Be careful not to cut too much as you may cut the vein (quick). If you accidentally cut the quick, wipe off the blood and apply Kwik-Stop or styptic powder to stop the bleeding. It is not serious and will heal quickly.

Beagle Puppy Intestinal Parasites

 
Deworming your Beagle Puppy is a critical part of his or her puppy care. 98% of all puppies are born with worms that they contracted before they were born from their mother.

 
There are many different species of worms which can affect your puppy’s growth and development. These worms are intestinal parasites, and contrary to popular belief, you probably won’t see them in the puppy’s stool unless they have a severe infestation.

 
We recommend having your Beagle Puppy’s stool checked periodically by your local veterinarian.

 
There are many different types of parasites that your Beagle Puppy can contract. These include: roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, coccidian, and giardia. These are the most common parasites that can affect your puppy. Safeguard (Fenbendazole) is highly recommended for treating Intestinal Parasites.

 
If giardia is present in your Beagle Puppy’s stool, your veterinarian may prescribe FLAGYL (metronidazole). If Coccidia is detected, your veterinarian may prescribe ALBON (sulfadimethoxine).

 
CONSULT YOUR LOCAL VETERINARIAN FOR PROPER DEWORMING

Beagle Puppy Heartworm Prevention

 
Most puppies should be started on a heartworm preventative at least by two months of age. And now in most areas of the United States, it is recommended that heartworm preventative be given all year long, although the risk of getting heartworms is still greatest in the summer months. Heartworm preventative is usually given monthly in the form of a chewable tablet. The most popular brands are Heartgard and Interceptor. It is important that you give this tablet every month. Please note that if your Beagle Puppy goes 6 months without heartworm prevention, consult your local veterinarian. Blood testing will be required before administering heartworm preventative.

 
CONSULT YOUR LOCAL VETERINARIAN REGARDING HEARTWORM PREVENTATIVE

Beagle Puppy Flea and Ticks

 
It is very important to keep your Beagle Puppy free of any fleas or ticks. He or she can become severely ill due to fleas and ticks.

 
Most flea products these days are effective against ticks as well as fleas. We recommend Frontline flea and tick preventative. It is a medication that is applied once a month to help prevent fleas and ticks. It is a liquid product applied topically to the skin between the shoulder blades.

 
CONSULT YOUR LOCAL VETERINARIAN FOR PROPER FLEA AND TICK PREVENTION

Beagle Puppy Feeding

 
Your Beagle Puppy will arrive with a bag of dry kibble. We recommend continuing to feed your Beagle Puppy the same food and slowly (over the course of 5 days) wean them off and put on a holistic puppy food such as Vet’s Choice or Wellness. During this weaning period, your Beagle Puppies stool may become soft or even turn to diarrhea. For this we recommend adding cooked white rice (no butter or flavorings) to the dry kibble.
 

Feeding Schedule

We recommend feeding your Beagle Puppy 3X daily (morning, afternoon, evening) until 6 months of age. After 6 months of age, you can feed your Beagle Puppy 2X daily (morning, evening). Adjustments can be made depending on your personal schedule. You should never leave food out all day long so that your Beagle Puppy will eat whenever he wants. You want your Beagle Puppy to eat on a set schedule.
 

Amount of Food

Follow the recommendations of the food manufacturer. On the back of the puppy food bag, you will find detailed feeding quantity based on your Beagle Puppies age and size.
 

Water

Water is to be left out all day and night. Never deprive your Beagle Puppy of fresh, clean water. Water is the most important nutrient of all.
 

Treats

Treats should never account for more than 10% of your Beagle Puppies caloric intake. Your puppy’s food is his sole source for the nutrition he needs, so do not over do it with the treats. Hard chew treats keep your Beagle Puppy entertained and may improve dental health by exercising the gums and scraping the teeth. It also satisfies your Beagle Puppies need to chew.

 
DO NOT GIVE YOUR BEAGLE PUPPY RAWHIDES OR PIG EARS FOR PUPPY TEETHING/TREATS. Pig ears break into small sharp pieces that can easily cause blockage. Rawhides are indigigestible and can cause your puppy to vomit. We recommend Bull Sticks for teething and milk bone dog biscuits for treats.

Beagle Puppy Ear Cleaning

 
Keeping your Beagle Puppies ears clean is very important. Maintaining clean ears will prevent ear disease. Check your Beagle Puppies ears weekly and clean routinely. To clean the ears, use an ear cleaner. Apply the ear cleaner into your Beagle Puppies ear canal. Gently massage the base of the ear for 15-20 seconds to soften any dirt. Wipe out the loose dirt using a cotton ball. Repeat until the ears are completely clean.

Beagle Puppy Bathing

We recommend using a puppy shampoo when bathing your Beagle Puppy. But before you bathe, you need to brush.

 

Brushing

By brushing your Beagle Puppy before bathing, you remove loose hair and significantly improve the effectiveness of the shampoo in cleaning down to the skin. Start by gently brushing at the head and work toward the tail. Brush in the direction of the coat’s grain to remove loose hair.

 

Bathing

Use only Puppy shampoo when bathing. Never use human shampoo as it contains much harsher detergents and can damage your Beagle Puppies sensitive skin. Thoroughly soak your Beagle Puppy with warm water and apply the puppy shampoo. Work from the neck to tail, and massage the shampoo into the hair. Use a wet cloth to wash the face, being careful not to get shampoo in the eyes. Rinse completely and make sure to check the groin area, armpits, and between toes.

 

Drying

KEEP PETS WARM AND AWAY FROM DRAFTS WHILE THE HAIR DRIES. DO NOT LET YOUR PET OUTSIDE UNTIL HAIR IS COMPLETELY DRY. To dry your Beagle Puppy, you can simply use a towel or blow dry. If you choose to blow dry, make sure it is with warm air and never hot air.

 

Puppy Cologne

If you choose to, you can spray and rub in puppy cologne as a finishing touch.

Beagle Puppy Crates

A dog crate is a metal, wire, plastic, or fabric enclosure with a door in which a dog may be kept for security or transportation. For best results in using crates, crate training is recommended.

 
• There are many types of crates, and variations within the types:

 
• FOR YOUR HOME, WE RECOMMEND PURCHASING A WIRE CRATE (pictured on right). Wire crates come in all different sizes. We recommend a small to medium crate that is foldable and has a divider. Make sure to put a towel, pad, or soft blanket in the crate so that your Beagle puppy can lie down comfortably. We also recommend covering the back part of the crate at least halfway with a sheet.

 
• Solid plastic crates are usually more suitable than other types for secure travel, such as in an airplane. They might also be safer in a car accident than other types. Disadvantages are that they take up a lot of space and do not fold for storage.

 
• Aluminum crates can be either fixed or folding. A few of their advantages are: light weight, very strong when constructed with appropriate bracing, will not rust, excellent airflow & vision for the dog, appealing looks compared to wire crates. Aluminum crates are suitable for use at veterinary hospitals, car travel, as a permanent “den” for your dog inside the home and in breeding kennel environments.

 
• Soft crates can always be easily folded for storage or transport and are lightweight. They provide your dog with a stronger sense of security but still allow visibility and airflow. They cannot be used with dogs who are likely to dig or chew at the crate, and they are unsuitable for transporting dogs in any type of vehicle. Dog tents are a new alternative to soft crates. They offer many of the same advantages (and disadvantages) of soft crates but fold down to an even smaller size and are ultra lightweight so that they can be stuffed into tent bags and taken virtually anywhere. They make ideal enclosures for people who need to pack their soft crates into cramped vehicles or suitcases or for people who hike, camp or are involved in dog sports. Like soft crates, they are not suitable for puppies, dogs who are not housebroken, or for vehicle travel.

Preparing For Your Beagle Puppies Arrival

Below is a list of supplies you will need before bringing home your Beagle Puppy.    Some supplies are optional and some are a necessity.   We strongly recommend being prepared beforehand to assure an easy transition for you and your Beagle Puppy.

Things You Will Need Before Bringing Your Beagle Puppy Home

 

Needed Supplies Optional supplies
Stainless Steel Water Bowl

Stainless Steel Food Bowl

Leash and Collar

Premium Brand Dog Food (Holistic)

Dog Crate

 

Treats

Dog Bedding

Dog Toys and Chews (Bull Sticks)

Dog Brush

Puppy Shampoo

Dog Clippers

 

 

 

 

 

Picking Up Your Beagle Puppy at the Airport

 
1. Please arrive at the airport before your Beagle puppy is scheduled to arrive, and go to the live cargo pick-up area for the traveling airline. This spot is different in many airports and it is good practice to call the regional airport ahead of time to find out this location.

 
2. Bring with you the shipping information and two forms of identification.

 
3. You may also want to bring a bottle of water, a blanket or towel, and something super tasty like boiled chicken pieces, cheese, or other meat pieces. Your Beagle puppy may be very hungry and thirsty or not hungry or thirsty at all. Do not be alarmed if either happens. Once your Beagle puppy gets home and adjusted into its own new bed (you may want to continue to use the crate) with new toys and the same food and familiar blanket, your Beagle puppy should start eating and playing normally. If the puppy is not eating much, mix rice or chicken and add it to the dry food your Beagle puppy came with. Do not over-feed your Beagle puppy human foods which may lead to digestive discomfort.

 
4. The first thing you do when you take the puppy out is to take it to the closest grassy spot ASAP. THEN give your Beagle much love and tender care. Contact LittleLindas to let us know that your puppy has arrived safely.

 
Checklist:
– Bring paper towels, a blanket or towel
– Bring newspaper
– Trash bag
– Bring a leash and collar
– Bottled water and a bowl
– Boiled chicken pieces, cheese, or other meat pieces
– Wetwipes for self cleanup

Beagle Puppy Proofing Your Home

 
Puppy proofing your home is not only a smart thing to do it can also save your Beagle puppy’s life. Puppies will chew on anything and everything – including electrical wires, chicken bones, socks, and underwear. Puppy proofing is easy to do, follow the steps below and your house will be puppy proofed in no time.

 
-WHEN UNSUPERVISED, YOUR BEAGLE PUPPY SHOULD BE CRATED.
See Article on Home Page regrading Beagle Crates.

 
-Check for and secure electrical wires so that they are not within reach of your labrador retreiver puppy.

 
-Put safety latches on cabinets that have poisonous items — often under the kitchen and bathroom sinks.
Ask for these latches at your hardware store.

 
-If your Beagle puppy will have access to a garage, be sure there is no anti-freeze within reach.
It has an attractive smell and taste to dogs and cats.

 
-Walk around your home and look for things that are potentially dangerous for your Beagle puppy.

 
-Pick up trash containers that might contain anything harmful to your Beagle puppy.

 
-Remove any poisoinous household plants.
See List of Poisoinous Plants on Home Page.

 
-If you have a fenced yard, terrific! Walk around your fencing and look for any place that your Beagle puppy might be able to squeeze through. See if anything else in the yard needs puppy proofing.

 
-Plan your potty-training arrangements.
Where do you want the puppy to do its stuff?
How will you clean it up?

 

Beagle Puppy HouseBreaking

 

Bringing your Beagle Puppy puppy home is one of the most exciting moments. There is a new bundle of furry joy that enters your family and settles in for a long and nurturing bond between dog and human. However, this joy can quickly disperse as the role of housebreaking comes along and you start to become frustrated.
First, the new Beagle Puppy owner must realize that not all dogs are the same. One puppy may be easily trained by the time it is 12 weeks old, while another puppy could be 5 months old before being fully housebroken. Each puppy is different and must be trained according to what fits for that particular puppy.

 
What is housebreaking?
Housebreaking is the act of getting your puppy to soil where you want. Usually this is outside of the home but some owners of smaller breed dogs choose to litter train their puppies instead. For Beagle Puppies, litter training is not an option so we must assume that the Beagle Puppy will be trained to pee and poop outside of the home.

 
Importance of Schedules
Schedules are one of the most important aspects of housebreaking your puppy. The first thing any new or expecting family should do is create a bathroom schedule for their new puppy.

 
Puppies around 8-16 weeks old will usually need to go to the bathroom every 3 hours. Therefore, you should schedule bathroom breaks every couple of hours, even if your puppy does not show signs of having to go to the bathroom. If you keep to a 3-hour schedule, your puppy will catch on quickly and start to begin to hold from going to the bathroom indoors until that scheduled potty break. As your puppy gets older, this 3-hour schedule can be extended an hour at a time, until your puppy can finally wait up to 8 hours or more. Please note that this is a gradual process and will take several weeks to months before being able to wait that long as a puppy’s bladder is underdeveloped when young and cannot physically wait that long without having the urge.

Training to go Potty

 
So now that you know what housebreaking is and the importance of scheduling, how do you get your puppy to go outside? It is a simple process of awarding your puppy for good behavior.

 
Most Beagle Puppy owners follow a very simple routine when they take their puppy outside: take your puppy out on a leash directly to the spot you want your puppy to eliminate, use a command to tell your puppy to do its business such as Go Potty, do not play with your puppy while outside for bathroom time, as your puppy goes potty repeat the command over (this helps train your puppy to go on command), treat and praise when your puppy goes potty, do not return your puppy to the house until 10 minutes have passed even if your puppy has already eliminated (it may go potty again), and praise your puppy when it comes back into the house.

 
Beyond the 3-hour schedule, your puppy will need to go to the bathroom:
• When they wake up in the morning or after a nap
• Before they go to sleep
• After they play
• Before and after they go on a car ride
• When they get overly excited

Using a Crate
 

We strongly urge crate training for housebreaking puppies. By using a crate, you provide your puppy with its own den and capitalize on its innate tendency to keep this area clean. A puppy kept in its crate for a reasonable period of time – no more than three to four hours at a time during the day – will refrain from soiling and will learn to hold itself until you let it out. Consistently doing this will help your puppy establish a regular schedule for elimination. Crates also prevent young puppies from getting into mischief when you cannot watch them and confines their chewing to objects you have provided. Like children, puppies need lots of rest but they also require pleasant physical contact and socialization. Use common sense about how much time your puppy should spend in its crate.
Introducing the Crate

 
It is important to introduce your puppy to the crate gradually. It may be helpful to use treats to provide a positive association with entering the crate. As your puppy becomes comfortable with the crate, you can increase the time that it spends there, realizing that it is important not to overuse it. Your puppy should not live in its crate — he or she should live with you. However, use the crate for the periods of time when it cannot be watched, when it is resting or eating and while it is being housebroken. This time staying in the crate will teach your puppy to hold itself. Used this way, a crate is an important aid in your puppy’s adjustment to its new life.
 

Housebreaking is not always an easy task but it doesn’t have to result in frustration and hair loss. With Beagle Puppies, owners need to remain consistent and persistent in their training. Most owners become frustrated because they try something for a week or two and when it doesn’t work, they either give up or try something new. Unfortunately, this ends up confusing the Beagle Puppy and your puppy will be deemed un-trainable. When training fails, it is usually that the owner does not remain consistent with the training or gives up all together. This leads to an 80-pound dog that rules the roost and a very important bond between owner and Beagle Puppy that is lost.

 
Remember that each Beagle Puppy is distinctly different. However, as long as you remain consistent and persistent in their training, it will be well worth your effort and will be highly rewarding. Your Beagle Puppy would never give up on you so never give up on your Beagle Puppy!

Beagle Puppy Training

 
There are many methods of dog training and many objectives, from basic obedience training to specialized areas including law enforcement, military, search and rescue, hunting, working with livestock, assistance to people with disabilities, entertainment, dog sports and protecting people or property.

 
As pack animals, wild dogs have natural instincts that favor cooperation with their fellow dogs. Many domestic dogs, either through instinct or breeding, can correctly interpret and respond to signals given by a human handler.

 
Most dogs live with people who want them to behave in ways that make them pleasant to be around, keep them safe, and provides for the safety of other humans and pets. Dogs do not figure out basic obedience on their own. The fundamental rule that must be remembered is that one should never apply human standards of society onto the dog with the assumption that the dog will understand. Never assume a dog is trying to insult, injure or deceive you on a personal level. Understand that it is acting as a dog naturally, innocently does, and should be met with patience and thoughtfulness, rather than forcefulness or retaliation. Many trainers treat their dogs with cruelty and irrational punishment, leading to measurably increased stress, illness, and tendency towards violence.

 
The hardest part of training is communicating with the dog in a humane way that the dog understands. However, the underlying principle of all communication is simple: reward desired behavior while ignoring or correcting undesired behavior. Corrections should never include harmful physical force or violence.

 
Basic pet obedience training usually consists of six behaviors:

Sit
Down
Stay
Recall (“come”, “here” or “in”)
Close (or loose-leash walking)
Heel

 

Reward and punishment

1. Positive reinforcement adds something to the situation to increase the chance of the behaviour being exhibited again.
2. Negative reinforcement removes something from the situation to increase the chance of the behaviour being exhibited again.

 
When training your dog, use positive training methods. This requires positively reinforcing good behavior rather than punishing to decrease bad behavior.

 
IMPORTANT: Dogs should not be punished by being placed within a cage, crate or carrier, especially one similar to where they eat or sleep. While this may confine the dog from further disruptive behaviour, and also may seem similar to “sending a child to their room” as a form of punishment, the dog’s mind will unfortunately begin to associate the cage with punishment, and will experience anxiety if put into the container, as a result of the negative feelings associated with it. Punishment involving confinement is an unusual and confusing type of situation for a dog, and should not be used for proper punishment

 

Rewards

Positive reinforcers can be anything that your dog finds rewarding – special food treats, the chance to play with a tug toy, social interaction with other dogs, or the owner’s attention.

 

Punishment

Punishments should only be administered as appropriate for the dog’s personality, age, experience and physical and emotional condition. Some dogs may show signs of fear or anxiety with harsh verbal corrections. Other dogs may ignore a verbal reprimand. Some dogs develop an aversion or fear of water, when water is sprayed at them as an aversive.

 
Keep in mind that each dog is distinctly different. Training methods should be administered only as appropriate. As long as you remain consistent and persistent in their training, it will be well worth your effort and will be highly rewarding. Your dog will never give up on you so never give up on your dog!

Beagle Puppy Temperament


Beagle

The Beagle is a breed of small to medium-sized dog.  A member of the Hound Group, it is similar in appearance to the Foxhound but smaller, with shorter legs and longer, softer ears.  Beagles are scent hounds, developed primarily for tracking hare, rabbit, and other game.  They have a keen sense of smell and tracking instinct that sees them employed as detection dogs for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world.  Beagles are intelligent, and are popular as pets because of their size, even temper, and lack of inherited health problems.

 

Although beagle-type dogs have existed for over 2,000 years, the modern breed was developed in Great Britain around the 1830s from several breeds, including the Talbot Hound, the North Country Beagle, the Southern Hound, and possibly the Harrier.

 

Beagles have been depicted in popular culture since Elizabethan times in literature and paintings, and more recently in film, television and comic books.  Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts has been promoted as “the world’s most famous beagle”.

 

History

 

Dogs of similar size and purpose to the modern Beagle can be traced in Ancient Greece back to around the 5th century BC.  Xenophon, born around 433 BC, in his Treatise on Hunting or Cynegeticus refers to a hound that hunted hares by scent and was followed on foot.  Small hounds are mentioned in the Forest Laws of Canute which exempted them from the ordinance which commanded that all dogs capable of running down a stag should have one foot mutilated.   If genuine, these laws would confirm that beagle-type dogs were present in England before 1016, but it is likely the laws were written in the Middle Ages to give a sense of antiquity and tradition to Forest Law.

 

In the 11th century, William the Conqueror brought the Talbot hound to Britain.  The Talbot was a predominantly white, slow, deep-throated, scent hound derived from the St. Hubert Hound which had been developed in the 8th century.  At some point the English Talbots were crossed with Greyhounds to give them an extra turn of speed.  Long extinct, the Talbot strain probably gave rise to the Southern Hound which, in turn, is thought to be an ancestor of the modern day Beagle.

 

From medieval times, beagle was used as a generic description for the smaller hounds, though these dogs differed considerably from the modern breed.  Miniature breeds of beagle-type dogs were known from the times of Edward II and Henry VII, who both had packs of Glove Beagles, so named since they were small enough to fit on a glove, and Queen Elizabeth I kept a breed known as a Pocket Beagle, which stood 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 cm) at the shoulder.  Small enough to fit in a “pocket” or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt.  The larger hounds would run the prey to ground, and then the hunters would release the small dogs to continue the chase through underbrush.  Elizabeth I referred to the dogs as her singing beagles and often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her Pocket Beagles cavort amid their plates and cups.  19th-century sources refer to these breeds interchangeably and it is possible that the two names refer to the same small variety.  In George Jesse’s Researches into the History of the British Dog from 1866, the early 17th century poet and writer Gervase Markham is quoted referring to the Beagle as small enough to sit on a man’s hand and to the:  little small mitten-beagle, which may be companion for a ladies kirtle, and in the field will run as cunningly as any hound whatere, only their musick is very small like reeds.  Standards for the Pocket Beagle were drawn up as late as 1901; these genetic lines are now extinct, although modern breeders have attempted to recreate the variety.

 

Eighteenth century

 

By the 18th century two breeds had been developed for hunting hare and rabbit: the Southern Hound and the North Country Beagle (or Northern Hound).  The Southern Hound, a tall, heavy dog with a square head, and long, soft ears, was common from south of the River Trent and probably closely related to the Talbot Hound.  Though slow, it had stamina and an excellent scenting ability.  The North Country Beagle, possibly a cross between an offshoot of the Talbot stock and a Greyhound, was bred chiefly in Yorkshire and was common in the northern counties.  It was smaller than the Southern Hound, less heavy-set and with a more pointed muzzle. It was faster than its southern counterpart but its scenting abilities were less well developed.  As fox hunting became increasingly popular, numbers of both types of hound diminished.  The beagle-type dogs were crossed with larger breeds such as Stag Hounds to produce the modern Foxhound. The beagle-size varieties came close to extinction but some farmers in the South ensured the survival of the prototype breeds by maintaining small rabbit-hunting packs.

 

 

Development of the modern breed

Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a Beagle pack in Essex in the 1830s and it is believed that this pack formed the basis for the modern Beagle breed.  Although details of the pack’s lineage are not recorded it is thought that North Country Beagles and Southern Hounds were strongly represented; William Youatt suspected that Harriers formed a good majority of the Beagle’s bloodline, but the origin of the Harrier is itself obscure.  Honeywood’s Beagles were small, standing at about 10 inches (25 cm) at the shoulder, and pure white according to John Mills (writing in The Sportsman’s Library in 1845).  Prince Albert and Lord Winterton also had Beagle packs around this time, and royal favour no doubt led to some revival of interest in the breed, but Honeywood’s pack was regarded as the finest of the three.

 

Although credited with the development of the modern breed, Honeywood concentrated on producing dogs for hunting and it was left to Thomas Johnson to refine the breeding to produce dogs that were both attractive and capable hunters.  Two strains were developed: the rough- and smooth-coated varieties.  The rough-coated Beagle survived until the beginning of the 20th century, and there were even records of one making an appearance at a dog show as late as 1969, but this variety is now extinct having probably been absorbed into the standard Beagle bloodline.

In the 1840s, a standard Beagle type was beginning to develop: the distinction between the North Country Beagle and Southern Hound had been lost, but there was still a large variation in size, character, and reliability among the emerging packs.  In 1856, “Stonehenge” (the pseudonym of John Henry Walsh, editor of The Field), writing in the Manual of British Rural Sports was still dividing Beagles into four varieties: the medium Beagle; the dwarf or lapdog Beagle; the fox Beagle (a smaller, slower version of the Foxhound); and the rough-coated or terrier Beagle, which he classified as a cross between any of the other varieties and one of the Scottish terrier breeds.  Stonehenge also gives the start of a standard description: In size the beagle measures from 10 inches, or even less, to 15. In shape they resemble the old southern hound in miniature, but with more neatness and beauty; and they also resemble that hound in style of hunting.

By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 Beagle packs in England.  The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.  The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of Beagle.  By 1902 the number of packs had risen to 44.

 

Beagles were in the United States by the 1840s at the latest, but the first dogs were imported strictly for hunting and were of variable quality.  Since Honeywood had only started breeding in the 1830s, it is unlikely these dogs were representative of the modern breed and the description of them as looking like straight-legged Dachshunds with weak heads has little resemblance to the standard. Serious attempts at establishing a quality bloodline began in the early 1870s when General Richard Rowett from Illinois imported some dogs from England and began breeding. Rowett’s Beagles are believed to have formed the models for the first American standard, drawn up by Rowett, L. H. Twadell, and Norman Ellmore in 1887.  The Beagle was accepted as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1884. In the 20th century the breed has spread worldwide.

 

Appearance

The general appearance of the Beagle resembles a Foxhound in miniature, but the head is broader and the muzzle shorter, the expression completely different and the legs shorter in proportion to the body.  This is because beagles were trained to use their sense of smell often, and they would bend down a lot. They are generally between 13 and 16 inches (33 and 41 cm) high at the withers and weigh between 18 and 35 lb (8.2 and 16 kg), with females being slightly smaller than males on average.

 

 

They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver), gumdrop nose.  The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw.  The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look.  The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips.  Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a short, slightly curved tail (known as the “stern”) tipped with white.  The white tip, known as the “flag” has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent.  The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active.  The Beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat.  The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.

 

Coloring

 

Beagles appear in a range of colors.  Although the tricolour (white with large black areas and light brown shading) is the most common, Beagles can occur in any hound colour.  Tricoloured dogs occur in a number of shades, from the “Classic Tri” with a jet black saddle (also known as “Blackback”), to the “Dark Tri” (where faint brown markings are intermingled with more prominent black markings), to the “Faded Tri” (where faint black markings are intermingled with more prominent brown markings).

 

Some tricoloured dogs have a broken pattern, sometimes referred to as pied.  These dogs have mostly white coats with patches of black and brown hair. Tricolour Beagles are almost always born black and white.  The white areas are typically set by eight weeks, but the black areas may fade to brown as the puppy matures.  (The brown may take between one and two years to fully develop.)  Some Beagles gradually change colour during their lives, and may lose their black markings entirely.

 

Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick Beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolour Beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.

 

Sense of smell

Alongside the Bloodhound, the Beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.  In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13 year study into canine behaviour.  As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a 1-acre (4,000 m2) field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it.  The Beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favour of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable.  The long ears and large lips of the Beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.

 

Beagle Puppy


Beagle

The Beagle is a breed of small to medium-sized dog.  A member of the Hound Group, it is similar in appearance to the Foxhound but smaller, with shorter legs and longer, softer ears.  Beagles are scent hounds, developed primarily for tracking hare, rabbit, and other game.  They have a keen sense of smell and tracking instinct that sees them employed as detection dogs for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world.  Beagles are intelligent, and are popular as pets because of their size, even temper, and lack of inherited health problems.

 

Although beagle-type dogs have existed for over 2,000 years, the modern breed was developed in Great Britain around the 1830s from several breeds, including the Talbot Hound, the North Country Beagle, the Southern Hound, and possibly the Harrier.

 

Beagles have been depicted in popular culture since Elizabethan times in literature and paintings, and more recently in film, television and comic books.  Snoopy of the comic strip Peanuts has been promoted as “the world’s most famous beagle”.

 

History

 

Dogs of similar size and purpose to the modern Beagle can be traced in Ancient Greece back to around the 5th century BC.  Xenophon, born around 433 BC, in his Treatise on Hunting or Cynegeticus refers to a hound that hunted hares by scent and was followed on foot.  Small hounds are mentioned in the Forest Laws of Canute which exempted them from the ordinance which commanded that all dogs capable of running down a stag should have one foot mutilated.   If genuine, these laws would confirm that beagle-type dogs were present in England before 1016, but it is likely the laws were written in the Middle Ages to give a sense of antiquity and tradition to Forest Law.

 

In the 11th century, William the Conqueror brought the Talbot hound to Britain.  The Talbot was a predominantly white, slow, deep-throated, scent hound derived from the St. Hubert Hound which had been developed in the 8th century.  At some point the English Talbots were crossed with Greyhounds to give them an extra turn of speed.  Long extinct, the Talbot strain probably gave rise to the Southern Hound which, in turn, is thought to be an ancestor of the modern day Beagle.

 

From medieval times, beagle was used as a generic description for the smaller hounds, though these dogs differed considerably from the modern breed.  Miniature breeds of beagle-type dogs were known from the times of Edward II and Henry VII, who both had packs of Glove Beagles, so named since they were small enough to fit on a glove, and Queen Elizabeth I kept a breed known as a Pocket Beagle, which stood 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 cm) at the shoulder.  Small enough to fit in a “pocket” or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt.  The larger hounds would run the prey to ground, and then the hunters would release the small dogs to continue the chase through underbrush.  Elizabeth I referred to the dogs as her singing beagles and often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her Pocket Beagles cavort amid their plates and cups.  19th-century sources refer to these breeds interchangeably and it is possible that the two names refer to the same small variety.  In George Jesse’s Researches into the History of the British Dog from 1866, the early 17th century poet and writer Gervase Markham is quoted referring to the Beagle as small enough to sit on a man’s hand and to the:  little small mitten-beagle, which may be companion for a ladies kirtle, and in the field will run as cunningly as any hound whatere, only their musick is very small like reeds.  Standards for the Pocket Beagle were drawn up as late as 1901; these genetic lines are now extinct, although modern breeders have attempted to recreate the variety.

 

Eighteenth century

 

By the 18th century two breeds had been developed for hunting hare and rabbit: the Southern Hound and the North Country Beagle (or Northern Hound).  The Southern Hound, a tall, heavy dog with a square head, and long, soft ears, was common from south of the River Trent and probably closely related to the Talbot Hound.  Though slow, it had stamina and an excellent scenting ability.  The North Country Beagle, possibly a cross between an offshoot of the Talbot stock and a Greyhound, was bred chiefly in Yorkshire and was common in the northern counties.  It was smaller than the Southern Hound, less heavy-set and with a more pointed muzzle. It was faster than its southern counterpart but its scenting abilities were less well developed.  As fox hunting became increasingly popular, numbers of both types of hound diminished.  The beagle-type dogs were crossed with larger breeds such as Stag Hounds to produce the modern Foxhound. The beagle-size varieties came close to extinction but some farmers in the South ensured the survival of the prototype breeds by maintaining small rabbit-hunting packs.

 

 

Development of the modern breed

Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a Beagle pack in Essex in the 1830s and it is believed that this pack formed the basis for the modern Beagle breed.  Although details of the pack’s lineage are not recorded it is thought that North Country Beagles and Southern Hounds were strongly represented; William Youatt suspected that Harriers formed a good majority of the Beagle’s bloodline, but the origin of the Harrier is itself obscure.  Honeywood’s Beagles were small, standing at about 10 inches (25 cm) at the shoulder, and pure white according to John Mills (writing in The Sportsman’s Library in 1845).  Prince Albert and Lord Winterton also had Beagle packs around this time, and royal favour no doubt led to some revival of interest in the breed, but Honeywood’s pack was regarded as the finest of the three.

 

Although credited with the development of the modern breed, Honeywood concentrated on producing dogs for hunting and it was left to Thomas Johnson to refine the breeding to produce dogs that were both attractive and capable hunters.  Two strains were developed: the rough- and smooth-coated varieties.  The rough-coated Beagle survived until the beginning of the 20th century, and there were even records of one making an appearance at a dog show as late as 1969, but this variety is now extinct having probably been absorbed into the standard Beagle bloodline.

In the 1840s, a standard Beagle type was beginning to develop: the distinction between the North Country Beagle and Southern Hound had been lost, but there was still a large variation in size, character, and reliability among the emerging packs.  In 1856, “Stonehenge” (the pseudonym of John Henry Walsh, editor of The Field), writing in the Manual of British Rural Sports was still dividing Beagles into four varieties: the medium Beagle; the dwarf or lapdog Beagle; the fox Beagle (a smaller, slower version of the Foxhound); and the rough-coated or terrier Beagle, which he classified as a cross between any of the other varieties and one of the Scottish terrier breeds.  Stonehenge also gives the start of a standard description: In size the beagle measures from 10 inches, or even less, to 15. In shape they resemble the old southern hound in miniature, but with more neatness and beauty; and they also resemble that hound in style of hunting.

By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 Beagle packs in England.  The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.  The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of Beagle.  By 1902 the number of packs had risen to 44.

 

Beagles were in the United States by the 1840s at the latest, but the first dogs were imported strictly for hunting and were of variable quality.  Since Honeywood had only started breeding in the 1830s, it is unlikely these dogs were representative of the modern breed and the description of them as looking like straight-legged Dachshunds with weak heads has little resemblance to the standard. Serious attempts at establishing a quality bloodline began in the early 1870s when General Richard Rowett from Illinois imported some dogs from England and began breeding. Rowett’s Beagles are believed to have formed the models for the first American standard, drawn up by Rowett, L. H. Twadell, and Norman Ellmore in 1887.  The Beagle was accepted as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1884. In the 20th century the breed has spread worldwide.

 

Appearance

The general appearance of the Beagle resembles a Foxhound in miniature, but the head is broader and the muzzle shorter, the expression completely different and the legs shorter in proportion to the body.  This is because beagles were trained to use their sense of smell often, and they would bend down a lot. They are generally between 13 and 16 inches (33 and 41 cm) high at the withers and weigh between 18 and 35 lb (8.2 and 16 kg), with females being slightly smaller than males on average.

 

 

They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver), gumdrop nose.  The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw.  The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look.  The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips.  Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a short, slightly curved tail (known as the “stern”) tipped with white.  The white tip, known as the “flag” has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent.  The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active.  The Beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat.  The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.

 

Coloring

 

Beagles appear in a range of colors.  Although the tricolour (white with large black areas and light brown shading) is the most common, Beagles can occur in any hound colour.  Tricoloured dogs occur in a number of shades, from the “Classic Tri” with a jet black saddle (also known as “Blackback”), to the “Dark Tri” (where faint brown markings are intermingled with more prominent black markings), to the “Faded Tri” (where faint black markings are intermingled with more prominent brown markings).

 

Some tricoloured dogs have a broken pattern, sometimes referred to as pied.  These dogs have mostly white coats with patches of black and brown hair. Tricolour Beagles are almost always born black and white.  The white areas are typically set by eight weeks, but the black areas may fade to brown as the puppy matures.  (The brown may take between one and two years to fully develop.)  Some Beagles gradually change colour during their lives, and may lose their black markings entirely.

 

Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick Beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolour Beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.

 

Sense of smell

Alongside the Bloodhound, the Beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.  In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13 year study into canine behaviour.  As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a 1-acre (4,000 m2) field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it.  The Beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favour of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable.  The long ears and large lips of the Beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.

 

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